Firefox 57 from an NVDA user’s perspective

Firefox 57, also known as Firefox Quantum, will be released on November 14. It will bring some significant changes to the Firefox rendering engine to improve performance and open the door for more new features in the future. Here is what you need to know if you are a user of the NVDA screen reader. Continue reading “Firefox 57 from an NVDA user’s perspective”

Making the Firefox developer tools accessible

In the first quarter of 2016, Yura, who is part of the accessibility team at Mozilla, and I are starting on a journey to make the firefox developer tools accessible. The majority of the tools are currently a very mouse-driven environment, and our goal is to make them equally accessible for keyboard users and those using assistive technologies such as screen readers. This blog post marks the beginning of that journey. Continue reading “Making the Firefox developer tools accessible”

Accessibility features in Firefox for iOS

After ten months in development, Mozilla today released Firefox for iOS worldwide. Firefox for iOS is bringing your synchronized bookmarks, history and other information associated with your Firefox account to the iOS platform. Moreover, it is also going to record pages you visit in your history and sync these back to your Firefox on Windows, Linux, Mac, and even Android devices.

From the start, we also made sure that Firefox for iOS supports multiple features of the iOS platform. Here are some highlights:

VoiceOver

Firefox for iOS supports VoiceOver. Since Apple’s app store rules force us to use the Safari rendering engine, that is accessible anyway. But we also made sure the browser’s UI, Settings views and other features all talk well with VoiceOver. Moreover, we also implemented audio cues to indicate page load progress and finish. Those of you using NVDA might feel a certain familiarity with these sounds. 😉

We are also taking advantage of the iOS 8 feature of custom actions in various places. So when you start to learn Firefox for iOS, make sure to turn on VoiceOver hints so you get notified when custom actions are available.

Some things we did not get to yet, but which are on our list of things to do are:

System font

We respect the system font setting in the UI. The web site could, of course, still set its own fonts, but all the accessibility settings pertaining to the Web View will work as they do in Safari.

Bold text setting

The Bold Text accessibility setting is respected. You can expect the UI to respond to changing this setting in your iOS system settings.

Switch control

Like VoiceOver, switch control should work in the browser UI. We also tried to always make sure that switch control cannot go to any hidden controls or the like that are not really actionable at a given time.

Some known issues

Where to get it?

Firefox for iOS is freely available on the iOS App Store. It runs on iOS 8 and later.