Easy ARIA Tip #7: Use “listbox” and “option” roles when constructing AutoComplete lists

One question that comes up quite frequently is the one of which roles to use for an auto-complete widget, or more precisely, for the container and the individual auto-complete items. Here’s my take on it: Let’s assume the following rough scenario (note that the auto-complete you have developed may or may not work in the […]

Why accessibility APIs matter

This morning, Victor from payPal and I got into an exchange on Twitter regarding the ChromeVox extension. ChromeVox is a Chrome extension which provides screen reading functionality for blind users. Through keyboard commands, the user can navigate page content by different levels like object by object, heading by heading, form control by form control, etc. […]

How I came to grudgingly accept aria-hidden

Yes, that’s right, I grudgingly accept the fact that aria-hidden is here, and most probably here to stay. Those of you who know me and have been involved in discussions with me, like poor Victor Tsaran, whom I pestered more than once to give me tangible evidence that aria-hidden solves problems normal visibility techniques don’t, […]

Easy ARIA Tip #6: Making clickables accessible

It often happens that designers and web developers agree on the fact that they do not like the standard buttons or the styling capabilities of buttons in browsers. To work around this, they then resort to what’s called clickable text. It is in many cases a simple span or div element with some funky styling […]

Sometimes you have to use illegal WAI-ARIA to make stuff work

In this blog post, I’d like to recap an experience I just had while trying to apply some accessibility enhancements to the NoodleApp app.net client. The problem NoodleApp uses keyboard shortcuts to allow users to switch back and forth between posts, messages etc. that are displayed on the screen. Using the j and k keys, […]

If you use the WAI-ARIA role “application”, please do so wisely!

This goes out to all web developers out there reading this blog and implementing widgets and other rich content in HTML, CSS and JavaScript! If you think of using the WAI-ARIA role “application” in your code, please do so with caution and care! And here’s why: What is it? “application” is one of the WAI-ARIA […]

From WAI-ARIA to HTML5 and back…or maybe not?

Over the weekend, I gave a presentation at the German Multimediatreff. I talked about how to make things more accessible by combining HTML5 and WAI-ARIA in smart ways, using HTML5 where available and appropriate, and enhancing the user experience where HTML5 still has gaps in the implementation. This is a recap of what I showed. […]

What’s new in accessibility in Firefox 6

On Friday May 27, a bigger update was offered to everyone on the Aurora channel that brought them up to a revision 6 Firefox. As this was a bigger update, it is time to also point out the new stuff to watch out for in accessibility. One thing I already blogged about is the HTML […]

New accessibility support for HTML5 elements and attributes

In the nightly builds starting November 9th, 2010, there are some HTML5 elements and attributes newly supported by the accessibility APIs. This will be in Firefox 4.0. Landmark elements mapped to WAI-ARIA landmark roles We are mapping the following HTML5 landmark elements to accessibles with WAI-ARIA landmark role semantics: HTML5 element WAI-ARIA role article main […]

Apple’s iOS 4 supports WAI-ARIA landmarks

This is, I believe, my 100th post on this blog, and I’m using it to announce that Apple’s iOS 4, released yesterday for the iPhone and iPod Touch, supports WAI-ARIA landmark in the VoiceOver screen reader. VoiceOver has had, since its inception, a feature called the rotor. The rotor allows users to set a particula […]