Your must read post for this week

This goes out to all my readers who are web developers, or who work with web developers closely enough to hand this to them.

It’s Monday morning, and for this week, I have a must read post for you which you will now bookmark and reference and use with every single web component you build! No, this is not a suggestion, it’s an order which you will follow. Because if you don’t, you’ll miss out on a lot of fun and grattitude! I’m serious! So here goes:

Web Components punch list by Steve Faulkner of the Paciello Group

Read. Read again. Begin to understand. Read again. Understand more. Read yet another time. Get the tools referenced in the post. Check your web component(s) against this list top to bottom. If even a single point is answered “no”, fix it, or get on Twitter and ask for help in the accessibility community on how to fix it. Listen and learn. And repeat for every future web component you build!

And don’t be shy! Tell the world about that your web component is accessible from the start, usable by at least twenty percent of people more than would otherwise! I kid you not!

Happy Monday, and happy coding!

Started a 30 days with Android experiment

After I revisited the results of my Switching to Android experiment, and finding most (like 99.5%) items in order now, I decided on Tuesday to conduct a serious 30 days with Android endeavor. I have handed in my iPhone to my wife, and she’s keeping (confiscating) it for me. I will also keep a diary […]

Revisiting the “Switch to Android full-time” experiment

Just over a year ago, I conducted an experiment to see whether it would be possible for me to switch to an Android device full-time for my productive smartphone needs. The conclusion back then was that there were still too many things missing for me to productively switch to Android without losing key parts of […]

Quick tip: Add someone to circles on Google Plus using a screen reader

In my “WAI-ARIA for screen reader users” post in early May, I was asked by Donna to talk a bit about Google Plus. Especially, she asked how to add someone to circles. Google Plus has learned a thing or two about screen reader accessibility recently, but the fact that there is no official documentation on […]

Accessibility in Google Apps – an overview

I recently said that I would write a blog series about Google apps accessibility, providing some hints and caveats when it comes to using Google products such as GMail, Docs, and Drive in a web browser. However, when I researched this topic further, I realized that the documentation Google provide on each of their products […]

WAI-ARIA for screen reader users: An overview of things you can find in some mainstream web apps today

After my recent post about WAI-ARIA, which was mostly geared towards web developers, I was approached by more than one person on Twitter and elsewhere suggesting I’d do a blog post on what it means for screen reader users. Well, I’ve got news for all my blind and visually impaired readers: You’re not getting one […]

Improvements to the handling of the aria-pressed attribute

On Monday this week, Heydon Pickering brought to my attention that Firefox has a problem with the way it handles the aria-pressed attribute in some circumstances. aria-pressed is used on buttons (or elements that have a WAI-ARIA role of “button”) to turn it into a toggle button which can be either pressed or not. Think […]

What is WAI-ARIA, what does it do for me, and what not?

On March 20, 2014, the W3C finally published the WAI-ARIA standard version 1.0. After many years of development, refinement and testing, it is now a web standard. But I am often asked again and again: What is it exactly? What can it do for me as a web developer? And what can it not do? […]